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Himalayan

The Himalayan cat was developed in the 1930s as a result of crossing Siamese and Persian cats to achieve a long haired breed of cat that has the points of the Siamese. The cat credited with being the first example of the modern Himalayan feline breed was named, “Newton’s Debutante.”

Himalayans have a large, round head, short neck, with comparatively small, round tipped ears. The face is very similar to the Persian, with the mouth pushed in and with a frowning expression. The eyes are large, round, and widely set with varying shades of blue. The color points some in the following colors: chocolate, seal lilac, blue, red-tortie, cream, seal- lynx, blue- lynx, red- lynx, cream- lynx, tortie- lynx, blue-cream lynx, chocolate- lynx, lilac- lynx, chocolate-tortie- lynx and lilac-cream- lynx. The body varies in shades from white to fawn. due to their partially Siamese heritage, they tend to be a bit more active, playful, and curious than Persians. Supported by short chocolate- lynx, lilac- lynx, chocolate-tortie- lynx and lilac-cream- lynx. The body varies in shades from white to fawn. due to their partially Siamese heritage, they tend to be a bit more active, playful, and curious than Persians. Supported by short legs, Himalayans are great slinkers, but not very good jumpers.

Himalayan cats are easy going and calm like their Persian cousins. However, due to their partially Siamese heritage, they tend to be a bit more active, playful, and curious than Persians. Very intelligent and social cats, Himalayan cats make loving, interactive companions.

The fur is very long and forms mats easily. As such, Himalayans need to be brushed daily to keep optimal coat health and luster. Also, Himalayans should be bathed every 2 – 4 weeks to reduce coat oil and therefore tendency to mat. Most Himalayan cats have to have the faces (around the eyes and nose especially) wiped with a damp cloth.

Due to a lot of commercial inbreeding, Himalayans unfortunately are known to often have genetically inherited disease predispositions and deformities. Himalayans are prone to medially luxating patella and other joint abnormalities, polycystic kidney disease, chronic kidney failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

 

Roger L. Welton, DVM

Founder and Chief Editor, Web-DVM.net

President, Maybeck Animal Hospital

 

Article updated 11/5/2012

 

 

 

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