Health, advice, and information online community for dog and cat lovers.

Limping Kitten Front No Trauma

Be sure to check between your kitten’s paw pad webbing to make certain there are no thorns, grass spurs, or other foreign objects lodged there. Also check for any split or damaged nails, as these are common injuires in cats. If you do not find anything there, then please refer to the following possible causes for your kitten’s limping based on the history you provided. The following disease is an inherrited genetic deformity commonly seen in puppies. In kittens and cats, it is not genetically inherrited, but is the result of malpositioning of the front limb in the uterus prior to birth. As such, the article below deals primarily in terms of canine, but the clinical consequences are just as relevent to felines who have this problem:

Elbow dysplasia

If you would like to consult with a veterinarian 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, please refer to our AskTheVet page

One thought on “Limping Kitten Front No Trauma

  1. Jennifer G Gardner says:

    We adopted a kitten from the shelter who was in bad shape. He had to have his eye removed due to infection and he also had a terrible upper respiratory infection. Later we discovered he had a horrible bacterial infection and had horrible bloody diarrhea. He limps occasionally and his remaining eye has consistent clear discharge. Our vet has put him on 4 types of antibiotics and 2 types of steriods over the past 6 months. He is currently on metronidazole and probiotics since his last episode of bloody diarrhea. I am just wondering if there is something bigger going on. His fecals always have lots of bacteria and rods but nothing else. He responds well to the meds but eventually has the same problems over and over. Do his symptoms ring any bells for you? He is currently taking lysine.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *